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Monday, October 21, 2019
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Angel Meadow: Origin and persistence of Victorian Manchester's hell on earth slum

Victorian Manchester was the world’s first industrial city – the shock city of its age. It was the first to experience the wealth and horrors that rapid urbanisation could bring. More than 200 years later, cities around the world continue to face unprecedented social, economic and environmental challenges. An estimated one billion people around the world live in slums – a figure the UN says will double by 2030. This study will investigate the origin and persistence of Angel Meadow - one of Victorian Manchester's most notorious slums. It will seek to bring context to recent archaeological excavations of workers' housing in Angel Meadow and add to the wider debate about the formation of modern slums.

Manifestos: Feminist genealogies, queer art histories

This thesis turns to manifestos produced since the late 1960s, through which important intersections between aesthetics and radical gay, lesbian and queer politics become legible.

Conferred 2017

Revisiting English Chinoiserie from a Perspective of Postcolonialism: How Can New Narratives be Embedded into Cultural Heritage Sites through Art Practice?

A practice-based fine art research investigating the historiography of chinoiserie from a perspective of postcolonialism through exploring how otherness was prescribed to Chineseness.

Spaces of Cultural Resistance: The Contestation Between Tradition and Colonial Housing Typologies in Southern African Townships - Zimbabwe (1894-2005).

My research investigates housing typologies introduced by the dividing policies of colonial segregation. Through an analysis of cities conceived on the basis of ‘colour lines,’ it will explore how colonial architects and town planners as agents of empire exercised ideological practices, bringing them to bear upon the practical needs of future occupants. The study will proceed to analyse the impacts of colonial archetypes on the native inhabitants and examine spatialities created during moments contestations between forms and occupant customs. Furthermore, the research will reinvigorate the disengaged discourse, between occupants as social organisms and anti-social industrial housing, developed during emergence of colonial industrial and factory systems. Here, as in other global urban locations, that were/are designed on the basis of segregation to enhance an elite groups power and wealth ; the thesis intends to identify solutions to these marginalised spatialities. It aims to show how the differences between cultural methods of existence and imposed architecture grounded in colonial ideological legislation, needed/need reconciliation to conceive coherent mechanisms that accommodate for changes in postcolonial urbanism.

Interlooped: an investigation into how the primary structures of knit can inform and enhance the materialisation of 3D printed textile structures

3D printing is an emergent technology which when combined with established textile processes offers the opportunity for a new method of textile production. By emulating the structures of knit through the use of 3D Computer Aided Design (CAD) it is possible to print 3D structures which embed knit’s inherent properties of stretch and flexibility whilst exploiting the mechanical properties of the material used to print with. This offers the possibility to create novel forms with innovative applications. The research will take the four primary structures of knit (plain knit, purl knit, rib and interlock) as the starting point to develop a body of 3D printed textile based structures. This ‘material proposal’ (Karana et al, 2015) will be explored in synthesis with knit’s inherent properties of stretch and flexibility, an aspect currently unexploited in 3D printed textiles.

Code-Switching as an Evaluative Strategy: Identity Construction among Arabic-English Bilinguals in Manchester

This is an ethnographic study investigating the code-switching (CS) practices of a friendship group of five adult, female, non-UK born, Arabic-English bilinguals based in Manchester. By viewing CS as an evaluative stance and a tool for negotiating identity, the aim is to examine the ways in which the participants’ CS is utilised as a linguistic resource to perform their interactional identities. The main evaluative strategy explored is ‘attitude’ and the way it is expressed through the participants’ individual and relational CS moves.

Music as a collaborative discipline: issues to address, exchange of music and art elements and the role of the contributors.

The purpose of my research derives from the connection found between some contemporary music and the visual arts. Very often we can observe in painting a texture or structure that music can translate into different sounds applying techniques that can be understood as equivalent. The objective of my research is to work in extracting and moving by analogy concepts from one field to the other in a bidirectional way creating a code in which both disciplines merge into each other producing an audiovisual experience for the public. Both, sound and visual arts are understood as one full work where what we see is related to what we listen and vice versa.

Responses to the Culture and Politics of the United States of America in the Novels and Nonfiction of Anthony Burgess

To provide a critical account of the British author Anthony Burgess’s engagement with the culture and politics of the United States of America. Burgess travelled extensively in the USA for lecture tours, professorships, visiting author positions, book tours, and other artistic engagements. This enquiry involves original research into archived documents, audio recordings of lectures, unpublished letters and journalism. The dissertation will deploy this new material in a close analysis of six post-1960 novels and non-fiction books by Burgess.

Weaving with code: How can emotional attachment be designed into digital jacquard textiles using coding?

My Ph.D. research builds upon a variety of approaches to explore which factors generate emotional attachment into the practice of digital jacquard textiles and responds to an existing gap in research and data regarding emotional attachment into the digital jacquard design practice. It examines human responses to coding alongside the mechanical production of weaving on digital jacquard looms.

'Gender Politics: The Paratext In the Late 19th Century Feminist Periodical (Britain, c. 1888-1899): A Transdisciplinary Holistic Approach’

This thesis offers an interpretation of the feminist periodicals Women's Penny Paper, Woman's Herald and Woman's Signal, using an original modified version of linguist Gérard Genette's theory of the paratext as a methodology. It examines to what extent the gendered conventions of late nineteenth century Britain influenced the editorial identities of these general feminist periodicals, and whether emerging hybrid paradigms of late nineteenth century New Womanhood in any way challenged conventional patriarchal ideals. The findings reveal that the periodicals studied projected a voice that was critical of the established gendered norms, which manifested through a plethora of carefully orchestrated editorial choices.

Conferred 2017

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