16 C
Manchester, UK
Saturday, October 20, 2018
Home gender

gender

A Bourdieusian Analysis of Gender Capital in Ontario College Administrations

My project examines gender identity as a form of social capital, an endless dialectic, relational and evolving within middle management fields in diverse Ontario colleges neatly concealed by occupational structures. A prism through which to examine this phenomenon is Bourdieu’s (1977) concepts of capital, habitus and field (Bourdieu and Wacquant 1992, Iellatchitch, et. al 2003). Although the theorist was ‘gender blind’, instead preferring class as the primary structure of social space, Huppatz (2012) and other feminists (Moi 1991) have adopted and expanded Bourdieu’s concepts to advance the primacy of gender as a form of social capital and a means of informing and understanding gendered practices in the workplace.

The development of clothing concepts in response to analysis of changing gendered social attitudes.

This interdisciplinary study mixes practice and participant-based enquiry informed by phenomenology. It aims to understand the motivations of women who choose to wear male gendered clothing for fashion and to use this to question gender assignment in clothing, through practical experimentation. Fashions’ relationship with current social attitudes, particularly referencing gender assignment, will be explored. The PhD specifically aims to develop an experimental design approach by reviewing and reflecting on the process of constructing a series of garments which respond to women’s gender related preferences.

'Gender Politics: The Paratext In the Late 19th Century Feminist Periodical (Britain, c. 1888-1899): A Transdisciplinary Holistic Approach’

This thesis offers an interpretation of the feminist periodicals Women's Penny Paper, Woman's Herald and Woman's Signal, using an original modified version of linguist Gérard Genette's theory of the paratext as a methodology. It examines to what extent the gendered conventions of late nineteenth century Britain influenced the editorial identities of these general feminist periodicals, and whether emerging hybrid paradigms of late nineteenth century New Womanhood in any way challenged conventional patriarchal ideals. The findings reveal that the periodicals studied projected a voice that was critical of the established gendered norms, which manifested through a plethora of carefully orchestrated editorial choices.

Conferred 2017

Please Note

The keyword list below includes all the terms used by PGRs across individual profiles. The larger the size of a specific term in the list the more PGRs that use it.