MMU Professoriate Lecture – Impacts of the global trade in wildlife, 25 January

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Impacts of the global trade in wildlife – Prof. Stuart Marsden
Thursday 25th January, 18:00 (Refreshments available from 17:30)
T0.03, John Dalton building
Attendance to this event is free of charge, however we do ask that you book tickets in advance at https://impactstradewildlife.eventbrite.co.uk

The huge global trade in wildlife and wildlife products is of greater concern to conservationists now than ever before. I will introduce the scale and breadth of the industry and the diversity of species brought to edge of extinction by our demand for pets, meat, medicines, horns, feathers, and furs. I will discuss the main issues surrounding trade in wildlife and also our perceptions of what is right and wrong, and sustainable or ruinous. The talk will draw on our ecological work on parrots and other tropical species and will finish with an introduction to our current work on the seemingly insatiable demand for cagebirds in Asia.

Stuart Marsden is primarily a conservation ecologist. Much of his work concerns the effects of human actions such as land use change and direct exploitation on wildlife, including tropical birds, but also on primates, felines, amphibians, and UK species/systems biodiversity. Stuart works mainly through PhD students and research assistants, many from Asia, Africa and South America. Capacity building for conservation research within developing countries is a key aim of his work. Stuart became Professor of Conservation Ecology at Manchester Metropolitan University in 2015.

Refreshments will be available from 17:30 in MMU’s John Dalton building, with the talk beginning in Lecture Theatre T0.03 at 18:00. This will last around one hour and will include time for audience questions. The event will finish with a drinks reception and further discussion.

For queries related to this event or any others organised by MMU Engage, please email:engage@mmu.ac.uk.

via:
Ben Green
Enterprise Administrator 
Management Services Group
Faculty of Science and Engineering
Manchester Metropolitan University