POSTGRADUATE PROFILES

Tracing the social contract of photography: How do we evidence the collaborative social engagement process in photography without undermining the value of the final visual outcome?

The thesis sets out the theoretical framework for which the practice-based research is delivered, supporting but challenging to what extent, there is a ‘social contract’, inherent in photography as argued by Azoulay. The framework pays consideration to photography’s conflicted history, positioned between Rancière’s thinking of photography as a “trace of the true” against Sontag’s view of photography as enabling the “voyeuristic stroller”. For the purposes of this research, which actively privileges the process of social engaged practice in photography, weight is given to Rancière’s and Azoulay’s argument. The thesis further explores the principles of Helguera’s layers of participation, which discusses different approaches socially engaged art practitioners use for their collaboration with others. I specifically focus on the creative and collaborative participation methodology, which enables the most active and accessible approach to co-authoring art projects.

Conferred 2019

Contemporary Feminine Aesthetics After Postfeminism

My research investigates the relationship between 1990s-early 2000s postfeminist discourses of empowerment and constructions of female subjectivity in contemporary fictional genres aimed at women and girls.

The primary aim of the thesis is to better understand the impact of postfeminist empowerment discourse on women whose coming of age coincided with the height of its cultural ubiquity, and to explore the continuing postfeminist legacy in girlhood coming-of-age genres. To do this, I focus on the shifting affective registers of postfeminist culture and the role feelings and emotions play in constituting female subjectivity.

Conferred 2019

How Can Youth Be Celebrated Through Sculpture in the Public Realm?

This practice lead research investigates way in which sculpture can represent young people in the public realm. Whereby both, the public space of the municipal exhibition space and the public space of an urban park are investigated.

Music as a collaborative discipline: issues to address, exchange of music and art elements and the role of the contributors.

The purpose of my research derives from the connection found between some contemporary music and the visual arts. Very often we can observe in painting a texture or structure that music can translate into different sounds applying techniques that can be understood as equivalent. The objective of my research is to work in extracting and moving by analogy concepts from one field to the other in a bidirectional way creating a code in which both disciplines merge into each other producing an audiovisual experience for the public. Both, sound and visual arts are understood as one full work where what we see is related to what we listen and vice versa.

Experiencing ‘Ghost Developments’ in Post-Crisis Ireland: A practice led interdisciplinary investigation into land, private property and public space

I am a filmmaker currently conducting practice-led research into the newly built environment in post-economic crisis Republic of Ireland, with particular reference to unfinished housing estates and vacant commercial property- which I refer to as 'ghost developments'.

Conferred 2017

Deep Surface: A practice based enquiry of the picture plane.

How do we understand the active interchange between the outer face of an artwork and its inward-facing components, be these a design, a trace or a generating framework?

Over the course of the PhD enquiry I aim to interrogate physically through the making of artworks and theoretically, through a contextual underpinning, the depth of surface as a dense, complex and vacillating plane. The research aims to unpick the interplay between the outer public layer and the structure below, contributing to a new understanding of the picture plane within two dimensional Fine Art practice.

Meanwhile/Becoming: A Postphenomenological Position Exploring Vision and Visuality in Landscape Photography

Meanwhile/Becoming is a practice-led research project that investigates methods of creating photographs that do not conform to the Cartesian perspective prevalent in photographs taken with a standard format camera. The research explores the opportunity of examining a visual space other than that offered by the standard single lens reflex camera through manipulation of the pinhole camera. It uses processes that produce what the research describes as a reinterpretation of phenomenology, postphenomenology and posthumanism through photographic practice; where the photographs are expressive of the what and how humans see and the lived experience of the situated perspectives of a specific space.

Creating Images of Belonging through Diasporic Touch

My research project examines issues of belonging in the Swedish diaspora in the north of England bringing a minority discourse into the public realm. I am developing a notion called diasporic touch exploring how a combination of seeing, touching and creative writing opens up an imaginary space where ‘there and then’ is ‘here and now’, and where the process of making art generates a sense of belonging.

The Augmented Tonoscope: Towards a deeper understanding of the interplay between sound and image in Visual Music

Sound can induce physical form and flow - the stationary wave patterns of Cymatics (from the Greek: κῦμα“wave”). Dr Hans Jenny coined this term for his seminal studies into these phenomena in the 60s and 70s, using a device of his own design - the ʻtonoscopeʼ.

Conferred 2015

The role of curatorial practice in rethinking nature, posthuman and media environments in the Anthropocene

My research engages with critical debates on the Anthropocene focusing on recent discourses of media ecology and materiality creating a trajectory between hidden toxic territories in China and our technocapitalist societies. My work pays particular attention on the 'curatorial' as a mode of theorisation as well as a research methodology. The project will deploy through a series of talks, a conference and a final exhibition at the Centre for Chinese Contemporary Art (CFCCA) based in Manchester.

Disputing Jewish and Christian Identities in Nineteenth Century Paintings.

This project will investigate the construction of Jewish and Christian identities in the painting "The Finding of the Saviour in the Temple" (1860) by William Holman Hunt and other relevant works. The Jewish nature of "The Finding" has been almost entirely overlooked to date. It has not been examined within the field of Jewish Studies and the attention that it has received within art-historical discourse has focused upon the Christian message offered by the artist and his associates. The scene is known as "The Disputation". Assumed to portray a generalised theological dispute between Christianity and Judaism, it also references scholarly disputations, regarded as determinants of truth within the developing academy.

The role of design practice in exploring and interpreting paranormal phenomena.

The concept of para-design will be developed through a series of studies that explore, test and measure the experience of unexplained phenomena. Findings from this research project have potential to enrich a broad range of future research in the design of scenarios for health and wellbeing, enriching social and cultural relationships with place, establishing new connections with environmental ecology and developing new insights for architecture, design and spatial planning.