Experiments in somaesthetic art and the psychology of multisensory perception

. What are the implications of artists using galleries as perceptual laboratories or tools for exploring somaesthetic experience?

Through this interdisciplinary practice-based research, working closely with scientists, I plan to recreate a range of perceptual multi-sensory illusions. These will include somatic illusions of body ownership, [of body parts hands the face and tongue for example] as well as location and motion of the body in space. I hope to gain important insights from these experiments, which will inform a series of new artworks.

Weaving with code: How can emotional attachment be designed into digital jacquard textiles using coding?

My Ph.D. research builds upon a variety of approaches to explore which factors generate emotional attachment into the practice of digital jacquard textiles and responds to an existing gap in research and data regarding emotional attachment into the digital jacquard design practice. It examines human responses to coding alongside the mechanical production of weaving on digital jacquard looms.

The research aims to identify factors associated with attitudes to mathematics in 9-9 year old pupils in UK KS2 education. Through the use of quantitative methods, the research aims to identify if certain attitudes to mathematics are associated with demographic factors and beliefs towards gender ability.

Exploring the Link: Cognitive Enhancing Drug Use by Students in HE, Neoliberalism and Human Capital

Utilising a qualitative approach, my research will draw on neoliberalism and human capital, with the aim of establishing a theoretical framework of cognitive enhancing drug use by students in UK higher education.

Ibrik: Invigorating Cultural Heritage Within a Contemporary Context Through Redesign

The ibrik is a traditional Lebanese spouted water vessel with ties to Lebanese cultural heritage. Its production started as early as the Phoenician period in the Mediterranean area. While this object was once common to every household in Lebanon, today the ibrik is rarely used as intended. It either no longer exists or serves merely as decoration. The following project aims to redesign the ibrik through its animated cultural heritage as a craft and as a drinking vessel by embedding it with a contemporary visual dynamism.

Objects of Delight: The Nineteen Century Mass-Produced Miniature

My research explores the phenomenon of miniaturisation, as reflected by the global trade and consumption of mass-produced miniatures, and what it reveals about the nineteenth century people who delighted in, desired, acquired, displayed, collected and discarded them.

Conferred 2017

Deep Surface: A practice based enquiry of the picture plane.

How do we understand the active interchange between the outer face of an artwork and its inward-facing components, be these a design, a trace or a generating framework?

Over the course of the PhD enquiry I aim to interrogate physically through the making of artworks and theoretically, through a contextual underpinning, the depth of surface as a dense, complex and vacillating plane. The research aims to unpick the interplay between the outer public layer and the structure below, contributing to a new understanding of the picture plane within two dimensional Fine Art practice.

Experiencing ‘Ghost Developments’ in Post-Crisis Ireland: A practice led interdisciplinary investigation into land, private property and public space

I am a filmmaker currently conducting practice-led research into the newly built environment in post-economic crisis Republic of Ireland, with particular reference to unfinished housing estates and vacant commercial property- which I refer to as 'ghost developments'.

Conferred 2017

Manifestos: Feminist genealogies, queer art histories

This thesis turns to manifestos produced since the late 1960s, through which important intersections between aesthetics and radical gay, lesbian and queer politics become legible.

Conferred 2017

Landscapes of Identity: Visual Mapping System – Place Identity – Ethnically Diverse City

This research argues that deterministic decisions to fundamentally evolve the planning and design process to accommodate the diversity and temporality of urban occupation based solely on conventional inventory and analysis are severely lacking in representing social and emotional aspects of place and geography (Toms 2010).

Tracing the social contract of photography: How do we evidence the collaborative social engagement process in photography without undermining the value of the final visual outcome?

The thesis sets out the theoretical framework for which the practice-based research is delivered, supporting but challenging to what extent, there is a ‘social contract’, inherent in photography as argued by Azoulay. The framework pays consideration to photography’s conflicted history, positioned between Rancière’s thinking of photography as a “trace of the true” against Sontag’s view of photography as enabling the “voyeuristic stroller”. For the purposes of this research, which actively privileges the process of social engaged practice in photography, weight is given to Rancière’s and Azoulay’s argument. The thesis further explores the principles of Helguera’s layers of participation, which discusses different approaches socially engaged art practitioners use for their collaboration with others. I specifically focus on the creative and collaborative participation methodology, which enables the most active and accessible approach to co-authoring art projects.

Conferred 2019

The Multimodal book as organism, artefact and assemblage: non-human agency in processes of growing and making.

This practice-based research diffracts the hierarchical dominance of humans over nature by considering non-human agency in the processes of growing and making. The ‘multimodal book’, conceived as an investigative practice which includes the maker and reader, and also an assemblage of works which come together in an exhibition, is developed to examine and articulate human-non-human relationships. Haptic and temporal aspects of the book are explored alongside growing plants to set up a dynamic interplay between concepts of organism and artefact and to interrogate non-human agency in the processes of growing and making.