Drawing the Wake: illustrative notational drawing as a valid alternative reading of James Joyce’ Finnegans Wake

The place of Finnegans Wake in the canon of Western literature might initially to make it appear to be an odd choice of text for illustrative interpretation. However, its peculiar position as a hugely influential, yet relatively unread work suggest it as an appropriate object through which to examine interactions between the literary and the visual imagination.

Conferred 2018

The Flow of Life: Photographing architecture as populated spaces

My research concerns the representation of the built environment. In conventional architectural photography the form of buildings is shown without reference to the function of the spaces within and between them; which was the primary purpose for their construction.

Temporary City. Critical Approach to Temporary Urbanism in Post-Socialist and Post-Industrial Contexts

The aim of the PhD in Urban Studies and Architecture is to critically approach the concept of temporary urbanism and look if there lies an opportunity for triggering urban change on indeterminate landscapes that have emerged as a result of economic decline, reconfiguration of industry or change of regime.

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Conferred 2016

All The Men I Never Married: Poetry and Everyday Sexism

Despite the fact that most women will experience some form of sexism during their lifetime, contemporary poets have been strangely silent on this subject. My research project will address this gap by creating a portfolio of poetry which explores how experiences of 'everyday sexism' (Bates) and micro-aggression can be represented in poetic practice. The ability of the female poet, to use different modes of address, talking both to and about men and masculinity, and with the potential to explore previously ignored or neglected areas of female experience creates the potential for 'critical consciousness' (bell hooks) in the audience and the potential for social change. The project will also consider three other issues: the role of the female gaze, representations of female desire and how these poems are situated in a wider contemporary context of women's poetry.

What is the material agency of digital decay and how is it revealed through curatorial practice?

The concept of decay has been commonly associated with still life in art practice. Since the 1980s, the presence of digital technology in art has grown and notions of matter, the medium and immateriality had to be reconsidered in order to address art practices that deal with new materials. Building on Jussi Parikka’s idea of ‘geology of media’ (2015), the PhD aims at reconsidering the concept of decay and its intrinsic nature of material process, following new parameters of matter and time brought into discussion by digital technology. Considering materiality as materials immersed in an instable flow means to think of both software and hardware obsolescence as crucial elements in defining decay as a form of agency.

Conferred 2019

An Investigation of Syrian Conflict Photography on Flickr

The Arab Spring of 2011 saw the employment of social media, and contributed to the way in which photojournalists, citizen witnesses, and activists mediate and represent struggles and conflict in the Middle East (Allan, 2013). Looking particularly at Syria, the visual construction of the conflict is ever more present, and images of the war have become more common, as we now live in a world that is constructed more readily through imagery. Images are circulated with an unprecedented speed on global New Media outlets such as Facebook, Flickr and Twitter instantaneously (Anden-Papadopoulos and Pantti, 2013). Activists and citizen journalists have worked to gain public attention to fight against the Assad regime in Syria, largely through access to social media sites. In the process, activist groups such as Lens Young Dimashqi seek to record and document the conflict through photographic images of life during wartime.

Conferred 2017

How is Photography Performed in a Virtual Space?

My work is generated within the algorithmically determined space of 3D computer software, where the system itself is the subject matter and the performative act of imaging is the motivation for exploring the potentialities of the programme’s codes of construction. This digital 3D space is essentially photographic, where the modelling of light, its properties and qualities, determines the form of the image.

Tracing the social contract of photography: How do we evidence the collaborative social engagement process in photography without undermining the value of the final visual outcome?

The thesis sets out the theoretical framework for which the practice-based research is delivered, supporting but challenging to what extent, there is a ‘social contract’, inherent in photography as argued by Azoulay. The framework pays consideration to photography’s conflicted history, positioned between Rancière’s thinking of photography as a “trace of the true” against Sontag’s view of photography as enabling the “voyeuristic stroller”. For the purposes of this research, which actively privileges the process of social engaged practice in photography, weight is given to Rancière’s and Azoulay’s argument. The thesis further explores the principles of Helguera’s layers of participation, which discusses different approaches socially engaged art practitioners use for their collaboration with others. I specifically focus on the creative and collaborative participation methodology, which enables the most active and accessible approach to co-authoring art projects.

Conferred 2019

Can ‘Augmented Reality Games’ be a positive influence? The project will take the form of a series of walking interviews with players of the ARG Ingress to attempt to ascertain whether the game encourages healthy physical and social activity and, if so, whether this has wider implications for the use of ARGs in public spaces.

'Gender Politics: The Paratext In the Late 19th Century Feminist Periodical (Britain, c. 1888-1899): A Transdisciplinary Holistic Approach’

This thesis offers an interpretation of the feminist periodicals Women's Penny Paper, Woman's Herald and Woman's Signal, using an original modified version of linguist Gérard Genette's theory of the paratext as a methodology. It examines to what extent the gendered conventions of late nineteenth century Britain influenced the editorial identities of these general feminist periodicals, and whether emerging hybrid paradigms of late nineteenth century New Womanhood in any way challenged conventional patriarchal ideals. The findings reveal that the periodicals studied projected a voice that was critical of the established gendered norms, which manifested through a plethora of carefully orchestrated editorial choices.

Conferred 2017

What are the precursors to transformative moments within socially engaged arts practice?

I write as a participant, as an artist and as a member of the local community. By adopting artistic research methods, and specifically, by making work in the place where I live, which could be considered a form of auto-ethnographic artistic research, the research analyses social artistic processes from the perspective of the artist, adding to debates around what social arts practice is, and what its limits are in its original social context and within the gallery and documentary systems of dissemination.

Designing for Breed: Realigning British wool within the current UK knitwear industry

Over 60 different varieties of sheep are present in Britain today, reared by over 45000 farmers (BWMB 2009). Using a practice based enquiry, this research will examine the contribution of individual breed knowledge and new technologies in developing and encouraging sustainable British knitwear design and production.

Conferred 2018