Revisiting English Chinoiserie from a Perspective of Postcolonialism: How Can New Narratives be Embedded into Cultural Heritage Sites through Art Practice?

A practice-based fine art research investigating the historiography of chinoiserie from a perspective of postcolonialism through exploring how otherness was prescribed to Chineseness.

The Flow of Life: Photographing architecture as populated spaces

My research concerns the representation of the built environment. In conventional architectural photography the form of buildings is shown without reference to the function of the spaces within and between them; which was the primary purpose for their construction.

Reading Socially Engaged Book Art: Establishing New Dialogues

To construct a critical framework in which to read socially engaged book art (2000 to present day), with reference to selected case studies, through the mapping of connections between production methods, themes and book forms.

Towards a New Realism: An Investigation of the Possibilities for a Socially Engaged Painting Practice

I am proposing to examine the methodologies and signifying structures of ‘classical’, ‘critical’, ‘social’ and ‘socialist’ realist painting to determine whether they can be synthesised or adapted to generate a socially informed and democratically readable contemporary painting practice.

Formal Thought Disorder as Iterative Ambiguation; the Cognitive Constraints on Figurative Thought, Language, and Communication: Neurocognitive Correlates?

Formal Thought Disorder (FTD), the symptoms of which alter language at the levels of organisation and expression, entails incoherent discourse; which often exacerbates the implicit sensitivity of complex clinical interactions. Linguistic creativity, i.e., the manipulation of language for artistic purposes, also involves alterations at these same levels. The difference, however, is volitional. Investigations into the extent to which these processes are related are scarce; therefore, this project recruits experimental psycholinguistic methods to explore the symptoms of FTD as involuntary expressions of linguistic creativity. That is, as a pathology located in the neurocognition of creativity.

Responses to the Culture and Politics of the United States of America in the Novels and Nonfiction of Anthony Burgess

To provide a critical account of the British author Anthony Burgess’s engagement with the culture and politics of the United States of America. Burgess travelled extensively in the USA for lecture tours, professorships, visiting author positions, book tours, and other artistic engagements. This enquiry involves original research into archived documents, audio recordings of lectures, unpublished letters and journalism. The dissertation will deploy this new material in a close analysis of six post-1960 novels and non-fiction books by Burgess.

In the world of hypercomplexity and hyper rapid changes the answer to the escalating economic and social problems can only be a complex, comprehensive solution. And such a solution is more likely to emerge from design focused interdisciplinary collaborative networks which I believe will have the advantage in innovation. The question is how to "manage" such complex networks.

Haunting Corporeality: A Cultural History of the Animated Skeleton

The visage of an animated skeleton is an omnipresent theme in the cultural sphere of horror and the Gothic, but scant little attention has been given to this powerful symbol. My research blends literary studies, art history, archaeology, and thanatology to examine how the skeleton operates as a signifier throughout Western literary, visual, and material culture, originating during Medieval Christendom as a moralistic reminder of the afterlife and subsequently becoming a multi-faceted symbol for memorializing grief, disease and community health, class struggles, and ultimately humanity's own relationship with the vastness of time.

Examining William Bickerton: A Forgotten Latter Day Prophet

The life of the nineteenth-century American prophet, William Bickerton, was not explored comprehensively until 2017-2018 — two centuries after his birth. His life offers new and exciting perspectives for the historiographies of American revivalism, Christian Restorationism, millennialism, Mormonism, and biography. My articles, “The Rocky Road to Prophethood: William Bickerton’s Emergence as an American Prophet” (2017) and “Opening the Windows of Heaven: The Bickertonite Spiritual Revival 1856-1858” (2018), along with my book, William Bickerton: Forgotten Latter Day Prophet (2018), utilise an emic approach to examine Bickerton and his religious movement within the contexts of American culture and Mormonism.

Conferred Sep 2018

Portrait as Landscape: Rendering Topography of Face and Body

“Stop asking us for the inner being, essence, soul…,” Richard Avedon pleaded: "the surface is all you've got. "My research addresses questions of why when looking at portraits we instinctively make judgements about the subject’s character and personality and why such assumptions are wrong. Using a knowledge of the science of visual perception I will attempt to produce photographic portraits that reveal unexplored surface terrain unhindered by erroneous opinions.

What is the material agency of digital decay and how is it revealed through curatorial practice?

The concept of decay has been commonly associated with still life in art practice. Since the 1980s, the presence of digital technology in art has grown and notions of matter, the medium and immateriality had to be reconsidered in order to address art practices that deal with new materials. Building on Jussi Parikka’s idea of ‘geology of media’ (2015), the PhD aims at reconsidering the concept of decay and its intrinsic nature of material process, following new parameters of matter and time brought into discussion by digital technology. Considering materiality as materials immersed in an instable flow means to think of both software and hardware obsolescence as crucial elements in defining decay as a form of agency.

Conferred 2019

The role of design practice in exploring and interpreting paranormal phenomena.

The concept of para-design will be developed through a series of studies that explore, test and measure the experience of unexplained phenomena. Findings from this research project have potential to enrich a broad range of future research in the design of scenarios for health and wellbeing, enriching social and cultural relationships with place, establishing new connections with environmental ecology and developing new insights for architecture, design and spatial planning.